New Knowledge Resources – Local Poverty Dashboards

Two links have been added to our Knowledge Resources today –

Local child poverty dashboard of indicators

This dashboard provides a selection of data available at local authority level that can be used to monitor child poverty and its drivers locally. The indicators presented in this dashboard cannot measure child poverty directly in the same way as the indicators used for the national child poverty targets set out in the Child Poverty (Scotland) Act 2017. Data to inform the national targets are from the Family Resources Survey and Understanding Society, which can only provide statistics at Scotland level.

The content of this dashboard does not aim to provide a complete picture of the issue of child poverty locally. It offers an example of publicly available data that can help understand the local context for child poverty and its drivers. Other relevant information is available to local authorities and health boards through local sources, including research and operational information on service delivery.

Local financial vulnerability dashboard

The dashboard is an example of locally available data that can be used to monitor financial vulnerability.

Both resources are available via the KnowFife Hub Learning and Resources page. Some NHS Fife users have had an issue with the drop down box not appearing to select geography on the dashboards. If this is an issue for you please just type the Local Authority name.

 

Poverty in Scotland 2019 from Joseph Rowntree Foundation

Poverty in Scotland report published by Joseph Rowntree Foundation shows poverty in Scotland is rising, from an already unacceptably high level. More people are facing situations where they cannot afford the basics nor play a full role in society. Almost one in five people in Scotland live in poverty, and for children the situation is worse, with one in four in poverty.

  • The report advises the need to open up routes out of poverty and try to prevent more people from being trapped in this situation. History over the past 20 years tells us that this can be done. If there are the foundations that allow people to build a stable financial future, then poverty will fall.
  • This report shows the range of tools government has for solving poverty. New analysis shows the key role of housing in people’s lives, and how types of housing, and the lower cost of housing in particular in the social rented sector, mean that poverty is significantly lower in Scotland than in the rest of the UK overall.
  • The announcement of the Scottish Child Payment earlier this summer shows how seriously the Scottish Government is taking its legal obligations on reducing child poverty. But to reach the child poverty targets, and to make a Scotland without poverty for all a reality, we need a number of ambitious solutions across work, housing and social security.

 

Read the full report here

Please note the data reported on child poverty differs from our HMRC sourced data in KnowFife and The Joseph Rowntree Foundation does acknowledge figures may be different from other data sources. KnowFife data for % children (under 16) in poverty, 2009 – 2016 shows a downward trend for Fife, Scotland, Cowdenbeath and South West Fife local area committee (LAC) areas; Kirkcaldy and North East Fife LAC areas show no significant change with City of Dunfemline LAC predominantly a downward trend and both Glenrothes and Levenmouth LAC areas show a small increase in 2016 but otherwise a downward trend. This trend data can be found here

Also for a visual picture of child poverty in Fife please see our infographic already on the hub.

Event: Let’s Leave No-one Behind: Poverty and Protected Characteristics in Fife Workshop

People who are already affected by poverty can also face additional barriers in accessing anti-poverty measures or initiatives due to their protected characteristics.

Join us to find out the key issues as Fife Council Research Team and Fife Centre for Equalities present their joint findings from their collaborative research on Poverty and Protected Characteristics in Fife.

Then participate in discussions, sharing what you are doing to reduce poverty and how we can all commit to the challenge of reducing poverty in Fife for ALL.

For more details and if you have any specific questions or additional requirements, contact Elric at elric@centreforequalities.org.uk, or call 01592 645310.

To register your interest in attending click here:  https://letsleaveno-onebehind.eventbrite.co.uk

Fife Child Poverty Action Report June 2019

Around one in five children live in low income families in Fife and too many children are not ready to learn when they start school. Many people in Fife are unable to manage financially; more than a third of residents live in fuel poverty and around 24,000 residents are unsure about how they can pay for food.

Fife Council, NHS Fife and partners have developed the Fife Child Poverty Action Report to consider the delivery of existing child poverty measures and outline new actions that seek to create a step-change in efforts to tackle this persistent issue.

The report focuses on the three drivers of child poverty, as set out by the Scottish Government: income from employment, cost of living, and income from social security and benefits in kind.

Read the full report here.

Fife Findings: Child Poverty levels for Wards and Parliamentary Constituencies

The End Child Poverty coalition has just published a new interactive child poverty map covering Scotland and the rest of the UK, The local child poverty estimates are broken down by local authority, parliamentary constituency and ward.

The new figures reveal poverty affects children in every part of Scotland, with as many as 34% of children still living in poverty in Glasgow compared to 9% of children in Shetland. Read More

Fife Findings: Children in families with limited resources 2014-16

New data from the Scottish Government on “Children in families with limited resources across Scotland 2014-2016” provides estimates of the proportion of children in combined low income and material deprivation by council area and household characteristics. This was collected via the Scottish Household Survey (SHS) over three years, 2014 to 2016. Read More