SIMD20 vs. SIMD16 – Interactive StoryMap

An interactive swipe tool has been developed which allows us to see how the SIMD rankings for Fife neighbourhoods have changed from the 2016 SIMD to the 2020 SIMD. The rankings include areas such as the overall rank for the neighbourhood in Fife and also, how it ranks for other things such as Housing and Employment.

Click on the link to take a look: Interactive StoryMap

Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) –SIMD20

The Scottish Government launched its latest Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) –SIMD20 – on 28 January 2020. It ranks datazones (some 700 people on average) across Scotland from 1 (most deprived) to 6976 (least deprived). As an index, it measures relative not absolute deprivation (i.e. how multiple deprivation compares between datazones, rather than how much deprivation is in each) across small areas in Scotland.

A KnowFife briefing summarising the SIMD 2020 picture in Fife is available here.

Click the area name to access KnowFife Area Briefings. These provide details of how SIMD has changed throughout Fife since the 2016 SIMD alongside detailed information for the datazones within the Local Area Committee/Locality Area:

A creative SIMD comic published by Scottish Government 2020 illustrates ‘A Place in Time’ using Leven and Buckhaven as examples to illustrate and demonstrate SIMD application. This comic is an output from the project ‘ Visualising Inequalities and can be accessed here.

 

2018 Fife Population Estimates – Small Area

Where do we live in Fife? What areas have a higher population density? Is there a difference in distribution of age groups in different areas of Fife? How fast are the older age groups increasing? Are we seeing the same pattern throughout Fife? Which older age group has increased the most?

See the infographic here to answer all these questions and more.

New Knowledge Resources – Local Poverty Dashboards

Two links have been added to our Knowledge Resources today –

Local child poverty dashboard of indicators

This dashboard provides a selection of data available at local authority level that can be used to monitor child poverty and its drivers locally. The indicators presented in this dashboard cannot measure child poverty directly in the same way as the indicators used for the national child poverty targets set out in the Child Poverty (Scotland) Act 2017. Data to inform the national targets are from the Family Resources Survey and Understanding Society, which can only provide statistics at Scotland level.

The content of this dashboard does not aim to provide a complete picture of the issue of child poverty locally. It offers an example of publicly available data that can help understand the local context for child poverty and its drivers. Other relevant information is available to local authorities and health boards through local sources, including research and operational information on service delivery.

Local financial vulnerability dashboard

The dashboard is an example of locally available data that can be used to monitor financial vulnerability.

Both resources are available via the KnowFife Hub Learning and Resources page. Some NHS Fife users have had an issue with the drop down box not appearing to select geography on the dashboards. If this is an issue for you please just type the Local Authority name.

 

Poverty in Scotland 2019 from Joseph Rowntree Foundation

Poverty in Scotland report published by Joseph Rowntree Foundation shows poverty in Scotland is rising, from an already unacceptably high level. More people are facing situations where they cannot afford the basics nor play a full role in society. Almost one in five people in Scotland live in poverty, and for children the situation is worse, with one in four in poverty.

  • The report advises the need to open up routes out of poverty and try to prevent more people from being trapped in this situation. History over the past 20 years tells us that this can be done. If there are the foundations that allow people to build a stable financial future, then poverty will fall.
  • This report shows the range of tools government has for solving poverty. New analysis shows the key role of housing in people’s lives, and how types of housing, and the lower cost of housing in particular in the social rented sector, mean that poverty is significantly lower in Scotland than in the rest of the UK overall.
  • The announcement of the Scottish Child Payment earlier this summer shows how seriously the Scottish Government is taking its legal obligations on reducing child poverty. But to reach the child poverty targets, and to make a Scotland without poverty for all a reality, we need a number of ambitious solutions across work, housing and social security.

 

Read the full report here

Please note the data reported on child poverty differs from our HMRC sourced data in KnowFife and The Joseph Rowntree Foundation does acknowledge figures may be different from other data sources. KnowFife data for % children (under 16) in poverty, 2009 – 2016 shows a downward trend for Fife, Scotland, Cowdenbeath and South West Fife local area committee (LAC) areas; Kirkcaldy and North East Fife LAC areas show no significant change with City of Dunfemline LAC predominantly a downward trend and both Glenrothes and Levenmouth LAC areas show a small increase in 2016 but otherwise a downward trend. This trend data can be found here

Also for a visual picture of child poverty in Fife please see our infographic already on the hub.

Townscapes report on Scotland, Oct 19

The Townscapes project launched at the Bennett Institute brings together a variety of different data sources to offer a deeper analysis of how towns are faring across the regions and nations of Britain. It aims to step away from the generalisations and dogmas that infuse much of the contemporary policy debate and offer instead a more finely grained picture of how different towns relate to their wider regions and nations, as well as to their nearest cities. It showcases the merits of a more granular and regionally rooted perspective for our understanding of geographical inequalities and the kinds of policy needed to address them.

Interestingly, Dunfermline is the third most improving town in Britain in the Townscapes’ Improvement Index and no Scottish town features in Britain’s 20 most declining towns.

Read the report here

 

Scottish Household Survey 2018 Local Authority Tables

The Scottish Household Survey (SHS) is a survey conducted by the Scottish Government, used to evidence the composition, characteristics, attitudes and behaviour of households and individuals living in Scotland. Questions are asked face-to-face by an interviewer in homes all over Scotland. A random sample of the general population in private residences is used.

The Scottish Household Survey (SHS) 2018 Local Authority Tables were published on the 8th October 2019. These contain Local Authority level analysis that matches as closely as possible to the tables and charts that were published in September 2019 at National level in the SHS 2018 Annual Report.

The Local Authority Tables can be accessed in either a PDF format or an interactive Excel document.

Event: Let’s Leave No-one Behind: Poverty and Protected Characteristics in Fife Workshop

People who are already affected by poverty can also face additional barriers in accessing anti-poverty measures or initiatives due to their protected characteristics.

Join us to find out the key issues as Fife Council Research Team and Fife Centre for Equalities present their joint findings from their collaborative research on Poverty and Protected Characteristics in Fife.

Then participate in discussions, sharing what you are doing to reduce poverty and how we can all commit to the challenge of reducing poverty in Fife for ALL.

For more details and if you have any specific questions or additional requirements, contact Elric at elric@centreforequalities.org.uk, or call 01592 645310.

To register your interest in attending click here:  https://letsleaveno-onebehind.eventbrite.co.uk