Poverty in Scotland 2019 from Joseph Rowntree Foundation

Poverty in Scotland report published by Joseph Rowntree Foundation shows poverty in Scotland is rising, from an already unacceptably high level. More people are facing situations where they cannot afford the basics nor play a full role in society. Almost one in five people in Scotland live in poverty, and for children the situation is worse, with one in four in poverty.

  • The report advises the need to open up routes out of poverty and try to prevent more people from being trapped in this situation. History over the past 20 years tells us that this can be done. If there are the foundations that allow people to build a stable financial future, then poverty will fall.
  • This report shows the range of tools government has for solving poverty. New analysis shows the key role of housing in people’s lives, and how types of housing, and the lower cost of housing in particular in the social rented sector, mean that poverty is significantly lower in Scotland than in the rest of the UK overall.
  • The announcement of the Scottish Child Payment earlier this summer shows how seriously the Scottish Government is taking its legal obligations on reducing child poverty. But to reach the child poverty targets, and to make a Scotland without poverty for all a reality, we need a number of ambitious solutions across work, housing and social security.

 

Read the full report here

Please note the data reported on child poverty differs from our HMRC sourced data in KnowFife and The Joseph Rowntree Foundation does acknowledge figures may be different from other data sources. KnowFife data for % children (under 16) in poverty, 2009 – 2016 shows a downward trend for Fife, Scotland, Cowdenbeath and South West Fife local area committee (LAC) areas; Kirkcaldy and North East Fife LAC areas show no significant change with City of Dunfemline LAC predominantly a downward trend and both Glenrothes and Levenmouth LAC areas show a small increase in 2016 but otherwise a downward trend. This trend data can be found here

Also for a visual picture of child poverty in Fife please see our infographic already on the hub.

Townscapes report on Scotland, Oct 19

The Townscapes project launched at the Bennett Institute brings together a variety of different data sources to offer a deeper analysis of how towns are faring across the regions and nations of Britain. It aims to step away from the generalisations and dogmas that infuse much of the contemporary policy debate and offer instead a more finely grained picture of how different towns relate to their wider regions and nations, as well as to their nearest cities. It showcases the merits of a more granular and regionally rooted perspective for our understanding of geographical inequalities and the kinds of policy needed to address them.

Interestingly, Dunfermline is the third most improving town in Britain in the Townscapes’ Improvement Index and no Scottish town features in Britain’s 20 most declining towns.

Read the report here

 

Scottish Household Survey 2018 Local Authority Tables

The Scottish Household Survey (SHS) is a survey conducted by the Scottish Government, used to evidence the composition, characteristics, attitudes and behaviour of households and individuals living in Scotland. Questions are asked face-to-face by an interviewer in homes all over Scotland. A random sample of the general population in private residences is used.

The Scottish Household Survey (SHS) 2018 Local Authority Tables were published on the 8th October 2019. These contain Local Authority level analysis that matches as closely as possible to the tables and charts that were published in September 2019 at National level in the SHS 2018 Annual Report.

The Local Authority Tables can be accessed in either a PDF format or an interactive Excel document.